DeSean As Explosive As It Gets

Cal wide out makes defenses look worse than they are

Sept. 12, 2007

College Football Preview: Week 3

> The Red Zone  |  Tape It Up  |  Strike The Pose  |  Breaking The Code
> Amsinger: Picks  |  Sorenson: 10 Questions  |  Braff: Four's No Crowd  |  Hart: Poll Questions
> Alberts: DeSean Too Explosive  |  Beamer Not Overreacting   |  Blackburn: New Coach, New Swagger
> Williams: Lot To Like With Locker  |  Caparell: USC Ready For Another Big Road Test
> Jones: Put Up, Or Shut Up Time For Mike Hart


By Trev Alberts

Special to CSTV.com



TREV ALBERTS

Trev Alberts is a football analyst for CSTV and CSTV.com.
E-mail here!

 

You've got college football questions and CSTV football analyst Trev Alberts has answers and opinions. Each week Alberts will be answering questions and queries on the world of college football. So if you've got a question for Trev? Just ask him.

 

Is DeSean Jackson a more exciting player than Devin Hester was, taking everything that they do/did into account? - E.L., Des Moines, Iowa


 

 

 

I'll tell you, that's a really tough question. Golly, they're both so dynamic. I was in Miami that night when Devin Hester took back that punt against Louisville. That was a phenomenal run.

 

DeSean is just so explosive and he's a little guy - 160 pounder. He's not a polished wide receiver, but he's so physically gifted as an athlete that you just get out of the way and let him run. He's so fast, has such great vision that I think a lot of the time we miss - like his reverse against Colorado State last weekend - the fact that the other team is not necessarily playing bad defense. He makes it look so easy, he's just so good that he makes defenses look terrible.

 

Remember, heading into last weekend's game, Jackson had been punted to 27 times in his career and he's returned it for a touchdown six times. He's the most explosive player in the open field in college football.

 

What's the deal with all these injuries? It seems as if players are getting hurt at an alarming rate, in both college football and the NFL. Is there a direct reason for that? - Dennis, Maryland

 

Players are too big and too explosive and too dynamic. It's a scary game.

This is going to sound like I'm a weenie, but I watch games now and think to myself, "You've got to be kidding me."

 

The collisions that go on, the speed and the size of these players...I mean these guys are playing linebacker at 270 pounds and running 4.5 40s.

 

These kids are so strong nowadays, going to these training sessions in seventh and eighth grade. I never even lifted a weight until I got to college. We didn't have a weight room in my high school. The first time I ever squatted was at Nebraska. I did 225 and I could barely walk. I didn't even know what a squat was. I could hardly lift a thing.

 

Kids are testing their bodies to such an extent that I'm surprised there aren't more catastrophic injuries to be real honest.

 

With USF becoming more and more of a legit contender out of the Big East, Miami and FSU floundering and UCF already upsetting N.C. State and getting a shot at Texas in a brand new stadium, how do all these talented Florida teams plan to compete with each other? - Jeff, Florida

 

It's a great question because not only are they competing with each other, but as everyone knows Florida is a very fertile ground for recruiting for everyone else. The fact that Miami and Florida State are in the ACC, and Miami in particular, has opened up recruiting avenues for teams like Virginia Tech and Boston College to go down in there.

 

But at the end of the day it's still about which programs are winning and which programs have the best facilities. As long as Bobby Bowden is still coaching there will always be questions from other recruiters about whether or not he'll be there all four years of their career. That will continue to be used against him. Obviously Miami is going through a transition, but South Florida and UCF have done a great job of taking that next level guy, who maybe isn't Miami or Florida caliber, but is still an outstanding player and coaching them up.

 

Jim Leavitt has done a great job with the Bulls and in his league, playing against the likes of Cincinnati, his team looks awful fast. And many of those kids use the fact that they weren't recruited by Miami or Florida State as motivation.

 

There's tons of talent in Florida and I think most of the kids want to stay home. They want their mom and dad to watch them. So Leavitt can say that he plays in the Big East, in a BCS conference, rather than having a kid head off to somewhere else.

 

Fanstore.com